The Hero’s Journey- The Refusal of the Call

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Intellectual Credit Joseph Campbell

Last time in our discussion of the Hero’s Journey we looked at The Call to Adventure.

Today we will venture into the excitement of The Refusal of the Call.

The Refusal

refuse

Credit: zealoflife.blogspot.om

Once our intrepid hero has been called out of his/her World of Common Day, there is sometimes, and I emphasize sometimes, a moment or period of time where said hero does not want to go for a couple of reasons.

Hero is Unsure

obiwanwiltrainluke[1]

Credit: LucasArts

This reason is pretty self explanatory, but basically the hero is being tied down and is worried about his/her responsibilities or is just plain scared.

We see this again with Luke. Though he had an inward call, when the moment came for him to jump on a starship and head off into adventure, he tells Obi-Wan that he can’t because of his responsibilities.

Helper is Unsure

raidersofthelostark-karen-allen

Credit: Lucas Arts

In this case, the hero is all rearing to go, but his helper, more on this later, is holding him back for the same reasons as above. Once the helper, either lets go of his/her fear or his/her responsibilities are removed, then the adventure can begin.

For an example, think of Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Ark. Indiana is primed and ready to stop the Nazis and find the Ark first, but he needs the help of an old lover named Marion. When he meets up with her, she is unwilling to go because of her responsibilities in her bar. But when the Nazis burn it down, all bets are off and Marion is finally ready to embark on the adventure.

Sometimes

And sometimes, the refusal doesn’t exist at all. Sometimes, the hero goes about his/her adventure without barrier, border, or barricade and plunges head first into the foray. Sometimes.

Next time I will go into more detail about the 4 types of helpers you will encounter on a hero’s journey.

Until then,
Peace and Long Reads

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The Hero’s Journey- The Call to Adventure

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Intellectual Credit Joseph Campbell

Last time in our discussion of the Hero’s Journey we looked at The World of Common Day.

Today we will venture into the excitement of The Call to Adventure.

The Call to Adventure

cutcaster-photo-100132136-Businessman-taking-phone-call

Credit: cutcaster.com

In this progression of the ordinary Joe Shmoe becoming a hero, we see that there is a moment when the safety net of The World of Common Day will be taken away, and the hero is compelled to make a choice to leave. This can occur in two possible scenarios.

Scenario One: The Inward Call

obiwanwiltrainluke[1]

Credit: LucasArts

In this scenario, the hero has a strong desire to see “what’s out there”. There is often a pining for stories of other heroes and adventures and expressions of boredom with his/her common day. Sometimes the hero’s desires may be squelched, but eventually those roadblocks are taken away and he/she is free to pursue the adventure. An example for this can be found once again in the iconic Star Wars.

As we last left Luke, he was drowning his sorrows in his blue milk wanting to join the Rebels in their fight against the Empire. His uncle played the killjoy and refused to let him leave, promising just “one more season”. But as Luke runs into a stubborn little astrodroid named R2D2 with a penchant for running away, he is forced into abandoning his homestead just as Imperial troops arrive to destroy it and his family. (This is the roadblock being removed.) As sad, and slightly horrifying, as this moment is, Luke is now free to follow his longing to leave and join Obi-Wan and the Rebels and begin his journey.

Scenario Two: The Outward Call

frodo-and-the-ring

Credit: New Line Cinema

In this scenario, there is some force compelling the hero to take action and leave behind his/her boring life. Most often, the hero is not looking for adventure and is as peachy as can be in his/her comfort zone.

But along will come some person or item that will warn of danger. And in some cases, the hero simply gets kidnapped and forced on to the journey. Usually there will be a constant pining for home or at the very least a desire to know how everyone at home is coping.

The best example for this (though since this story was published many have copied it) is The Lord of the Rings.

I’ll wager to guess you were even already thinking about it.

Little old Frodo, comfy and cozy, living with his uncle in a beautiful shire has no thought of the outside world. Though he knows of his uncle Bilbo’s adventures, he spends his days having fun with his pals. Then along comes news of Bilbo’s ring and the danger with it, and Frodo is all of a sudden forced out of his home and onto the road of sure death. Goodbye safety net, hello adventure.

The next stage in our journey will find both Luke and Frodo unsure of what to do. More on this next time.

Until then,
Peace and Long Reads

The Hero’s Journey- World of Common Day

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the-hero_s-journey

Intellectual Credit Joseph Campbell

So, this post basically has to start with an apology for my absence. It has been a little more of a hectic month than I thought it would be with the newborn, finishing the school year, and starting summer school.

But now I am starting a class teaching 6th and 7th graders about reading and using Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey as the class theme.

The basic premise is to read one fantasy novel and follow the hero through the nine stages of his journey.

And since I am a soon to be a self-published author in the fantasy genre, I felt that the lessons would be very a pro pos.

The World of Common Day

bored-at-work

Credit NBC- Jim and Pam at work.

The Hero’s journey is a simple one and can be found in just about any story. These types of stories are most common in fantasy where a simple person goes off on some quest to become a hero.

But no matter how the story pans out or evolves, every Hero’s journey takes root in what is known as The World of Common Day

This world is, simply put, the protagonist’s every day life. (Think Hobbits in The Shire or the Pevensies in our world, England) It is the comfort zone. It is the bubble that cannot be shattered. (But, of course, will be shattered.) It is the ultimate boring life that nags at all heroes and makes them urge, nay desire, nay yearn for Excitement and Adventure! (Though many, I’m sure, would claim they do not want adventure. Common Hobbits fit this description.)

But do not let this stage fool you, oh no! It is the mother of all stages. It is the first stage. It is what allows all readers to get their feet wet. It is the stepping off point for all other steps the hero will take in the journey. Though sometimes lacking in drama, tension, or suspense, this first stage in the Hero’s Journey is essential in order for the reader to have a baseline for the transformation that is to take place.

And for those aspiring writers out there who envision taking the plunge into their own writing journey, I urge you, do not shrug this stage off! It can be the most beneficial to you!

How?

For a deeper understanding of this first step into the Hero’s Journey, let us take a look at an example from the iconic Star Wars. (And, yes, I do mean A New Hope.)

luke-skywalker-tatooine

Mr. Skywalker in all his awesomeness

Luke Skywalker, the protagonist, lives with his aunt and uncle on a moisture farm in the middle of a desert planet called Tatooine. Though he does not live the perfect Leave it to Beaver life, his life is pretty comfy, complete with protocol droids, igloo-like stone houses, and blue milk.

And as we find out in the infamous and aforementioned blue milk scene, Luke has a distaste for the governing empire and wants to leave this World of Common Day to join the rebels in their fight.

Now, if this was the entire story setting, we would have all bled from our eye sockets due to boredom because the common day is just that, common. There may be some minor conflict, but all in all nothing happens here.

Lucky for us, Luke does not stay in The World of Common Day for very long. His journey through the stages takes a wild turn when he meets an unexpected stranger and progresses into the Call to Adventure. More on this stage of The Hero’s Journey next time.

Until then, Peace and Long Reads.

Finally!

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The day you have been waiting for has arrived!

Your anticipation has been filled to the brim.

That pounding in your chest can finally subside.

Now available in paperback and kindle on Amazon.

Buy it here

It’s coming closer!!!

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It’s only 1 week away now!!!

May 1st.

It’ll be here before you know it.

Get excited!

(Wait, you probably already are…)

Stay excited! Excite someone else!!!

Free Preview to The Arising Book 2 of The Stones of Revenge

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Chapter One 

Tactics and Tailors

He raised his sword to guard against the tremendous weight of the blade crashing down upon him. The odors of sweat and dirt filled his nostrils as the threat of death filled his mind.  Sharp metal slashed against sharp metal. He took a step back. The blade sprung towards his left side this time. Deftly, he rotated his own saber and placed it between the deathblow and himself. The man pushed against it making his opponent retreat a few steps. Now, he was on the offensive. Quickly, he charged.

Forward thrust.

Parry.

Side thrust.

Parry

Forward thrust.

Parry.

Push forward. Push forward.

Forward thrust. Side swipe.

Parry.

Side swipe, feint, rotate wrist.

Move to block.

Disarm.

The crowd surrounding the two combatants erupted in cheers. The man reached down and retrieved his opponent’s sword lying in the dust. His challenger, a young man, held out a shaking hand. He delicately placed the saber into it, and the two of them bowed to one another. The younger man stalked off happy to be alive, but not quite sure what had happened. Another young lad from the crowd stepped forward.

“Sergeant Preston, how do you make it look so easy?”

“Practice. Years of practice,” he said quietly sheathing his sword. Then he barked, “Attention!”

Immediately, the clanging of shields and armor silenced as the men snapped their heels together and stood tall.

“I propose a challenge. Winner receives an invitation to the Captain’s Feast this eve.”

Immediately, a large crowd of men sprang forward.

“Loser must keep guard along the ridge, unaccompanied.”

“But, sir, the frosts. No one can survive them,” one said.

“If that is his fate,” Preston said stone-faced.

All but two of the men retreated. The sergeant examined them in great detail.

“So – there are still men of valor left in the realm. Draw your weapons.”

Their swords scraped against the metal on their sheaths that hung about their hips. The soldiers stood facing each other. The first combatant lifted his blade high above his broad shoulders exposing his rib cage. He angled his body so as to make himself as small as possible behind his circular shield.

His guard is too high, Preston thought.

The second warrior held his steel directly in front of his shield. He set his stocky frame shoulders-width apart baring the fullness of his chest to his opponent.

He is too cocky.

Preston stood in their midst. “The fight will continue until the first stain of red falls on this dust.” Both men nodded their head without moving any other muscle. “Begin!”

The crowd of men circled around the contestants cheering with bloodlust.

The two warriors circled each other, evaluating the other. The tall soldier kicked a few small pebbles toward his opponent.

Don’t take the bait, Preston coached in his head.

When he didn’t react, the first soldier moved in closer.

Well done.

Dust filled his nostrils. The must made it difficult to breathe, but he refused to spend the night on the ridge.

The stocky soldier had been in this position before. The fear in his stomach was familiar, yet he knew he only narrowly escaped last time. The scar on his side was his constant reminder.

The first man attacked swinging his sword wildly overhead from side to side. The blade crashed upon his opponent’s shield.

Clang.

Rookie mistake.

The second combatant thrust his bronze disk away from him throwing off the blade. With his free hand, he swung his sword horizontally across his rival’s chest. It caused a deep gash in the breastplate.

“Good, Merek,” Preston said.

The first warrior took three considerable steps backward. Merek saw the momentary hesitation and leapt upon him. He charged forward using his shield as a weapon to cut out the man’s feet under him. The tall soldier jumped and narrowly missed the hit. Merek did not let off. He swung his sword with a strong backhand toward the other’s helmet. But he did not hit his mark for the sword was met by a shield. A terrible crash resonated throughout the arena.

“Well countered, Fendrel,” Preston coached again.

The two men returned to their circular berth neither finding the other’s weakness. The restless crowd jeered at them.

“Cowards!”

“Fight!”

How sickening! These men were unwilling to stand in combat, but all too willing to see a brother bleed. Preston spat upon the ground.

At the taunting, the two men became incensed. They no longer strategized, but instead were compelled to fight with blind aggression.

Fendrel thrust his blade forward.

Merek parried and countered.

Fendrel sidestepped and followed with a right hook catching Merek just under the bronze helmet.

Merek was taken aback. He returned the blow with one to Fendrel’s chest using his shield.

Fendrel felt the full weight of the hit as it cracked the armor along the fault that had been created earlier.

Clamors for blood rang out.

Fendrel tore off his splintered breastplate and felt the fresh breeze blow across his sweat soaked torso. The move was more psychological than physical. He continued the battle fully exposed.

Now this I have never seen before.

Swing right.

Block.

Swing left.

Block.

Swing left.

Block.

Swing overhead.

Block and reversal.

Merek tried to take advantage of the open back, but Fendrel anticipated it. He swung his broadsword behind him and felt the twang of another blade hitting it. He spun around and swung his sword in a vertical circle striking Merek’s out of his hands. It rattled into the dust beyond the crowd.

“Sword, sword. I need a sword.”

He looked around frantically for someone to provide him a weapon. But Preston barked an order.

“Sheath you swords! Neither will receive assistance from you.”

Merek was trapped. He had no way to fight. His fate was sealed.

Unless.

He made an unexpected sprint towards Fendrel and tackled him. The weight of his armor aided in taking him to the ground. He wrestled for the blade and when he couldn’t steal it, he pummeled one fist after another into his enemy’s face. A trickle of blood seeped from his mouth, and he was obviously dazed. Merek pulled himself off of his opponent and stood tall over him. The man did not move. The sergeant moved over to the men.

“Make your next move.”

“He bleeds.”

“Yet, there is still breath in his lungs.”

“You would have me kill a fellow soldier?”

“He yet breathes,” Preston said again.

“Sir, I can’t.”

“If you cannot finish an enemy when he is down, you are unfit for the Sovereign’s army. Make no mistake, your enemies will not hesitate to kill you.

As if in response, Fendrel suddenly awoke and thrust his sword through Merek’s midsection. The blade was diverted, however, by Preston so that it merely gashed his side. A stream of blood oozed onto the dirt.

“Merek, you must leave immediately for your watch on the ridge. Henry will accompany you only long enough to dress your wound. Your watch ends at dawn.”

The diminutive soldier trudged off the field followed closely by a medic. Preston turned his attention to Fendrel.

“You will accompany me to the Feast this eve. Prepare yourself with the finest garb you own. We will meet at sundown on the castle commons. The rest of you! How dare you call yourselves men, let alone soldiers. None of you had the fortitude to seek combat this day, but sought out the blood of one of your comrades. You have disgraced this company.”

He paused for effect.

“You are dismissed.”

At the command, they, in unison, pounded a fist upon their chest and grunted an “Aye, sir!”

The men dispersed and headed for the barracks across the barren field they were standing in. At the same time, another man jogged across the field towards the arena sunlight glinting off of his bronze armor.

“Sir! Captain Royce is requesting a word with you. He says he has urgent business that concerns only you.”

 “Of course he does,” he said under his breath. “Tell him I’ll report in five minutes.”

“Aye, sir,” the soldier said then ran off in the direction he had come.

Half an hour later, the captain called Preston into his office in the square, marble building across the training grounds. His demeanor was as cold as he had ever seen. The captain’s face was stone, never betraying the emotions bottled up within. As he shut the large wooden door, an ominous boom echoed throughout the grounds.

“Sergeant, have you seen the condition of your recruits?”

“Aye, sir.”

“Then why are they the sorriest waste of space in the entire realm!” the captain said, his nose almost touching Preston’s. “Isn’t your job to turn them into warriors? My God, most days all I see is recruit after recruit headed for the healing quarters. If I had half a mind, I would report you to the Lieutenant for neglect of duty!”

Preston held his tongue as he had been trained. He did not flinch but steadily returned his commander’s gaze.

“Sergeant, I am forced to conclude that this, along with the death of that woman a month ago, takes your leadership ability into serious question.”

Preston cringed at the thought of that poor woman. Though he had dealt swiftly with the offenders, the situation had haunted him ever since.

“And possibly your loyalty,” he added, squaring his eyes at the sergeant. Preston clenched his fists until drops of blood appeared. No one had ever questioned his allegiance before.

Captain Royce took a long while to take in the moment. He did not speak, but rather bored his eyes into Preston. It was as if the moment he had waited so long for had arrived.

“Fortunately for you, those above me do not have the same concerns. You have been given an assignment,” the captain spoke suddenly, his voice echoing off the solid walls. “Lord Elton sent a priceless treasure, which had been in his family for three hundred years, to Lord Dawson for safe keeping during the Great War. The dagger has been a family heirloom for three hundred years. Lord Dawson was returning it when his envoy was attacked. Now, it has gone missing. In two days, you are to take a company of two of your most trusted men and return it safely to the Sovereign. The attack occurred at the crossroads near Rindland.”

“Understood, sir” Preston said.

“One more thing, sergeant.” The words nearly spit out of the captain’s mouth. “Fail, and I will personally see to it that you are stripped of your title and honor and removed from this army.”

“Understood,” he said through clenched teeth.

“Dismissed.”

Preston made an about face and walked out of the small room letting the door slam behind him.

Exercise 2: Character Dimensions

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glassessbook

Today I am bringing to you one of the lessons from the Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook by David Maass. This book is chock full of amazing ways to refine your manuscript and give your story that extra je ne sais quoi. I’m enjoying this book so much that I thought I would show you all a little bit of the work I have been doing.

(And maybe, while shamelessly plugging his book, Mr. Maass will inadvertently discover this blog, see that I am giving him free advertisement, become interested in my book, and advertise it unto the world. . . .Well a guy can dream, can’t he?)

Today’s lesson is about giving your protagonist conflicting sides to make them more dimensional and, in turn, making them more realistic. Now, I felt pretty confident that my protagonist was already quite multidimensional. Then I read this section from the book:

“How many sides of your current protagonist do you reveal? I know what you are thinking: My hero is multidimensional. Me hero is complex! But let me ask you: Is he complex and multidimensional only in your mind, or actually on the page?”

Ouch.

That forced me to take a step back and re-assess. I knew my hero could be multidimensional, but perhaps I needed to do a little more work. I was ready to accept Mr. Maass’ help.

Step 1: What is my protagonist’s defining quality?

This step was easy. I had already decided this way back when when I had first planned the novel: Idealist. I wanted Landon, my hero, to be an idealist. (Kind of like Luke Skywalker was in “A New Hope”.) Done.

Step 2: What is the opposite of that trait?

Easy again. Realist.

Step 3: Write a paragraph in which your protagonist demonstrates that trait.

Hmmm. Okay, now we got a problem. What part of the story should I use for context? Should it be in the beginning so readers can begin to see the depth of the character early on? or Should I give readers a few chapters to get used to one side of Landon’s character before I show them a new one? I began to get caught up in trying to write the perfect paragraph.

Finally, I decided to stop thinking and just start writing. I told myself to just take what comes out and fix it later.This is the God-awful paragraph that I wrote in 5 minutes:

“Landon saw the world around him. He understood Gavin’s words to be true. Life was not perfect. The world was a dark cruel place, as much as he didn’t want to believe it. So he understood why Gavin had done what he did. Survival of the fittest was the truth of the world.”

Image

Step 4: Repeat steps 1-3 with a different character trait.

I did and again this is the horrible first draft I came up with:

1. Optimist

2. Pessimist

3. “Of course he wasn’t here, he thought. No one ever really cared about him. His parents didn’t want him. His uncle never wanted him. This world didn’t even seem to want him.”

Image

Now these paragraphs definitely needs work, but I wanted to share with you that after having just done one of the exercises, I feel so much freer about who my protagonist is and where I can take him.

Eventually, I decided that the competed first paragraph could be added about halfway through the novel while the second could be placed towards the beginning. I even began plans for more qualities and more moments to show these qualities.

So far, I am only a few exercises into the book, but already I can tell you that it is a great tool for writers. I am beginning to see this as essential an understand why C.H. Griffin boasted so highly of it.

If any of you writers out there feel like you could use any help at all with your story, I highly suggest getting this workbook. It truly can change your manuscript into a breakout novel.

Now, I’m just praying it does for mine! 🙂

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